The mystery of the globe atop the Met Office

Sunday July 05, 2020 Written by Published in Education
Papaaroa Adventist School students discover the monitoring gauges at Cook Islands Meteorological Service. (CIMS) 20070202/03/04/05 Papaaroa Adventist School students discover the monitoring gauges at Cook Islands Meteorological Service. (CIMS) 20070202/03/04/05

Teanahera was told the big round thing is a crystal ball – now she knows what it really is! 

11-year-old Kaylan Herman believes that maybe one day, he will work at the Meteorological Service.

Herman and his year 5 and 6 Papaaroa Adventist School classmates took a field trip to the Meteorological Office and he was amazed with the study of the weather patterns and the machines used.

“It was exciting, we saw how they measured the rain and the wind, how they study the weather patterns or if an earthquake was going to happen. I came to understand how each staff works there and what they do,” he said.

Herman said they were shown how each instrument worked and shrugging his shoulders says: “Maybe one day, who knows, I could be working there.”

Teanahera Walton, 9, she also learnt a lot from the field trip especially with determining whether patters and how they can tell if it was going to rain or not.

Walton said she was especially excited with what she described “the round ball figure” at the top of the Meteorological Office.

She said they were always told it was a crystal ball! There is a plate under it and she always wanted to know what it was.

Met Service director Arona Ngari laughs. In fact, he says, it’s a giant magnifying glass that focuses the sun’s rays on a piece of card underneath. The beam burns a mark on the card, recording the sunlight hours on Rarotonga.

And he’s just published the sunlight hours for the past month: 204.9 hours of sunshine, which is not bad for this time of year – and a lot better than the six minutes recorded in Wellington, New Zealand, the other week!

The Meteorological Service says they had the pleasure of hosting the students from Papaaroa Adventist School and gave the young students an insight of what they do here at the office, and helped develop their knowledge of climate change and daily operations. 

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