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Film Raro goes international

Monday August 19, 2013 Written by Published in Entertainment
Mou Piri documents the back story of the famous Cook Islands love song. 13081906 Mou Piri documents the back story of the famous Cook Islands love song. 13081906 PHOTO FILMRARO.COM

At least two of the Film Raro films have found a home in an international film festival in Hawaii.

Little Girl’s War Cry and Mou Piri have been accepted to screen at the Hawaii International Film Festival (HIFF).

Little Girl’s War Cry director Erin Lau’s other short film Koa Ohana also made the cut.

Little Girl’s War Cry tells the story of a 10-year-old girl named Tiare, who adopts a super-hero persona to shelter herself from the reality of her mother’s abusive relationship with her boyfriend. Tiare’s hero-minded stance leads her to confront the violence that stains her childhood and discovers an inner strength and the power of the bond between mother and child.

Mixing heart-warming humour with the serious topic of domestic violence, the film received an award for its social message – presented at the film’s debut screening at Rarotonga’s auditorium by US deputy chief of mission Marie Damour.

Mou Piri, directed by Karin Williams, is a documentary about the famous Cook Islands song by the same name, written by Jon Jonassen – a composer who brought the song to life in the 1970s. The documentary explores the back-story of Mou Piri, which has become a popular wedding song on Rarotonga.

The 33rd Hawaii International Film Festival will run from October 10-20 this year.

According to its Facebook page, the Hawaii International Film Festival is a non-profit organisation that started as a project of the East-West Center – an educational and research institution created by the United States Congress, located on the University of Hawaii Manoa campus in Honolulu.

The first HIFF screened seven films from six countries to an audience of 5000 in 1981. HIFF has now had more than 12 screening sites on six Hawaiian islands and draws an audience of 80,000 or more from around the world.

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